Blunder! : how the U.S. gave away Nazi supersecrets to by Tom Agoston

By Tom Agoston

Contains index. Very fresh and tight reproduction. measurement: 6 1/4" x nine 1/4". No marks. Binding is tight, covers and backbone totally intact. Edges browned somewhat. now not Ex-Library. All books provided from DSB are stocked at our shop in Fayetteville, AR. Shipped Weight: below 1 kilogram. class: heritage; ISBN: 0396085563. ISBN/EAN: 9780396085560. stock No: 026588.

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By Tom Agoston

Contains index. Very fresh and tight reproduction. measurement: 6 1/4" x nine 1/4". No marks. Binding is tight, covers and backbone totally intact. Edges browned somewhat. now not Ex-Library. All books provided from DSB are stocked at our shop in Fayetteville, AR. Shipped Weight: below 1 kilogram. class: heritage; ISBN: 0396085563. ISBN/EAN: 9780396085560. stock No: 026588.

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More hundreds filled the great barracks. They lay in contorted heaps, half stripped, mouths gaping in the dirt and straw, or they were piled naked like cordwood. No written word can properly convey the atmosphere of such a charnel house, the Unbearable stench of the decomposing bodies. They were so far gone in the depth of starvation that death was a matter of hours. The highly efficient German Herrenvolk who caused the situation. . were acting out a clearly defined program. These prisoners were political enemies of the Third Reich, Germans, Poles, Hungarians, fourteen-year-old boys and aged men, French Resistance, Belgians, Poles, Russians—a Babel of tongues dying together in the filth and dirt of their own dysentery.

It also capped Himmler's ambition to put the SS into a policy-making operational slot in the aircraft industry. The letter of appointment, issued in the Reich Chancellory bunker, carried the solid black rubber stamp overprint GEHEIME KOMMANDOSACHE ("Top Secret Command Matter"). It provided the first official documentation of Hitler's complete distrust of both Goering and Speer, by subordinating both to Kammler in all matters of modern aircraft production. The sweeping authority Hitler conferred on Kammler was unprecedented on a further score.

4 In April 1945, less than four months before the A-bombs were dropped, Tokyo was not even blacked out. Night life on the Ginza was in full swing, and the crew of the U-234, just emerging from a long, drab fitting-out period in war-economy-geared, blacked-out Germany, was much looking forward to a stint in prewar luxury. In addition to a Japanese ensign, earmarked to be displayed as a courtesy flag upon entering Japanese territorial waters, the sub also carried invitation cards in Japanese for the reception the officers and crew had planned on arrival.

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