China to Chinatown: Chinese Food in the West (Globalities) by J.A.G. Roberts

By J.A.G. Roberts

China to Chinatown tells the tale of 1 of the main remarkable examples of the globalization of nutrition: the unfold of chinese language recipes, parts and cooking kinds to the Western global. starting with the debts of Marco Polo and Franciscan missionaries, J.A.G. Roberts describes how Westerners’ first impressions of chinese language nutrients have been decidedly combined, with many concerning chinese language consuming conduct as repugnant. chinese language foodstuff was once introduced again to the West simply as a curiosity.The Western stumble upon with a greater diversity of chinese language food dates from the 1st 1/2 the 20 th century, whilst chinese language foodstuff unfold to the West with emigrant groups. the writer exhibits how chinese language cooking has turn out to be appeared via a few as one of the world’s so much refined cuisines, and but is harshly criticized by way of others, for instance on account that its coaching comprises cruelty to animals.Roberts discusses the level to which chinese language foodstuff, as an aspect of chinese language tradition in another country, has remained differentiated, and questions even if its ethnic id is dissolving.Written in a full of life sort, the e-book will entice nutrition historians and experts in chinese language tradition, in addition to to readers drawn to chinese language delicacies. (20060712)

Show description

By J.A.G. Roberts

China to Chinatown tells the tale of 1 of the main remarkable examples of the globalization of nutrition: the unfold of chinese language recipes, parts and cooking kinds to the Western global. starting with the debts of Marco Polo and Franciscan missionaries, J.A.G. Roberts describes how Westerners’ first impressions of chinese language nutrients have been decidedly combined, with many concerning chinese language consuming conduct as repugnant. chinese language foodstuff was once introduced again to the West simply as a curiosity.The Western stumble upon with a greater diversity of chinese language food dates from the 1st 1/2 the 20 th century, whilst chinese language foodstuff unfold to the West with emigrant groups. the writer exhibits how chinese language cooking has turn out to be appeared via a few as one of the world’s so much refined cuisines, and but is harshly criticized by way of others, for instance on account that its coaching comprises cruelty to animals.Roberts discusses the level to which chinese language foodstuff, as an aspect of chinese language tradition in another country, has remained differentiated, and questions even if its ethnic id is dissolving.Written in a full of life sort, the e-book will entice nutrition historians and experts in chinese language tradition, in addition to to readers drawn to chinese language delicacies. (20060712)

Show description

Read Online or Download China to Chinatown: Chinese Food in the West (Globalities) PDF

Best chinese books

China to Chinatown: Chinese Food in the West (Globalities)

China to Chinatown tells the tale of 1 of the main amazing examples of the globalization of nutrients: the unfold of chinese language recipes, components and cooking kinds to the Western global. starting with the money owed of Marco Polo and Franciscan missionaries, J. A. G. Roberts describes how Westerners’ first impressions of chinese language nutrition have been decidedly combined, with many relating to chinese language consuming behavior as repugnant.

Lexicon of Reconstructed Pronunciation: In Early Middle Chinese, Late Middle Chinese, and Early Mandarin

Identified for his paintings in chinese language historic phonetics, Edwin Pulleyblank has compiled this lexicon to give within the results of his researches at the phonology of heart chinese language and its evolution to Mandarin. The lexicon enhances Pulleyblank's previous ebook, "Middle chinese language" by way of offering reconstructed pronunciation for roughly 8000 chinese language characters at 3 ancient phases.

Women’s Literary Feminism in Twentieth-Century China

It is a serious inquiry into the connections among emergent feminist ideologies in China and the creation of 'modern' women's writing from the loss of life of the final imperial dynasty to the founding of the PRC. It accentuates either famous and under-represented literary voices who intervened within the gender debates in their iteration in addition to contextualises the suggestions utilized in imagining replacement tales of woman adventure and power.

Additional resources for China to Chinatown: Chinese Food in the West (Globalities)

Sample text

The prevalence of Buddhism was the reason for the low consumption of meat. Some Western vegetables were now being grown in China, including peas introduced by the Dutch, which were generally eaten in the pod in stews. Chinese cabbage was used in Western embassies as a substitute for lettuce. Davis reiterated that the common people were omnivorous and ate dogs, cats and rats. The ‘great save-all’ however was the pig, the flesh of which was by far the commonest meat. He quoted Tacitus as an authority for the claim that frequent consumption of pork produced or predisposed to leprosy, a claim which he considered corroborated by the evidence that leprosy and cutaneous infections were common in China.

Having observed a Chinese official, a ‘good hearty fellow’ eating a meal, he took the opportunity to taste every dish ‘and found them extremely good and well flavoured’. 17 John Barrow, a man from a humble background, who had risen under the patronage of Sir George Staunton to become the comptroller of the embassy, also gave a more positive view of Chinese food. Referring to the incident described by Anderson concerning the Chinese scavenging pigs which had been thrown overboard from the Lion, he asserted that the animals had not died of disease, but had been ‘bruised to death’.

The pizzles were sun-dried and rolled in pepper and nutmeg. Before cooking they were soaked in rice-water and then boiled in the gravy of a kid, seasoned with various spices. His description of the origin of birds’ nests was similarly fanciful. The nests, he claimed, were found on rocks along the coasts of Tongking, Java and Cochin China and were made by a bird resembling a swallow, possibly using little fish which it caught in the sea. More probably the birds distilled a viscous juice from their beaks to make their nests, but they had also been seen using the froth which floats on the sea to cement their nests together.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.75 of 5 – based on 35 votes