Constraints on Reflexivization in Mandarin Chinese by Haihua Pan

By Haihua Pan

First released in 1997. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa corporation.

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By Haihua Pan

First released in 1997. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa corporation.

Show description

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Since all the occurrences of ziji in (96) precede ye and those in (97) are focussed by lian ... dou, we can say that the occurrences of ziji in these sentences are not adverbials but part of the subject. Note that there are no linguistic antecedents for these occurrences of ziji. , Cole and Sung(1994), that ta-ziji in object position is never emphatic. This is shown by the following examples, where pro is interpreted as referring to you. One remark is in order about the third-person reflexives used alone as in (96c), (97c), and (98b).

G. objects or obliques. Therefore, the correct generalization for the blocking effect is that only intervening first and second person pronouns can induce the blocking effect. And first and second person NPs in ANY grammatical functions, not just those serving as subjects or contained in a subject, can block long-distance binding of ziji. g. the LF movement analyses of ziji, will fail to explain the blocking effect. 6 The Maximal-clause Effect It is claimed in the literature that only local and matrix subjects are possible antecedents of ziji in the case where all intervening noun phrases have the same person feature.

I also argue that the claim that any intervening subject can block an NP with different person features from binding ziji (Tang 1989, Xue, Sag and Pollard 1994) is not accurate, and the correct descriptive generalizations should be (a) that only intervening first and second person NPs can block ziji from being bound to an antecedent across its local subject and (b) the blocking effect is observed no matter what grammatical functions the first and second person NPs carry. I will further show that subject orientation is just a tendency; it obtains only if the competing NPs and subject are both qualified antecedents of ziji.

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