'Deficient in Commercial Morality'?: Japan in Global Debates by Janet Hunter

By Janet Hunter

This enlightening textual content analyses the origins of Western lawsuits, familiar within the past due 19th century, that Japan was once characterized on the time through incredibly low criteria of ‘commercial morality’, regardless of a big political and financial transformation. As Britain industrialised in the course of the 19th century the problem of ‘commercial morality’ was once more and more debated. matters approximately criteria of industrial ethics prolonged to different industrialising economies, reminiscent of the us. Hunter examines the japanese reaction to the fees levelled opposed to Japan during this context, arguing that this was once formed by way of a realistic popularity that Japan had little selection yet to evolve itself to Western expectancies if it used to be to set up its place within the worldwide economic system. the debate and criticisms, that have been at the least partially encouraged through worry of jap festival, are vital within the background of pondering on company ethics, and are of relevance for today’s industrialising economies as they try to determine themselves in overseas markets.

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By Janet Hunter

This enlightening textual content analyses the origins of Western lawsuits, familiar within the past due 19th century, that Japan was once characterized on the time through incredibly low criteria of ‘commercial morality’, regardless of a big political and financial transformation. As Britain industrialised in the course of the 19th century the problem of ‘commercial morality’ was once more and more debated. matters approximately criteria of industrial ethics prolonged to different industrialising economies, reminiscent of the us. Hunter examines the japanese reaction to the fees levelled opposed to Japan during this context, arguing that this was once formed by way of a realistic popularity that Japan had little selection yet to evolve itself to Western expectancies if it used to be to set up its place within the worldwide economic system. the debate and criticisms, that have been at the least partially encouraged through worry of jap festival, are vital within the background of pondering on company ethics, and are of relevance for today’s industrialising economies as they try to determine themselves in overseas markets.

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Additional resources for 'Deficient in Commercial Morality'?: Japan in Global Debates on Business Ethics in the Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries

Sample text

It was from this perspective that officials sometimes offered advice for trading with other countries and cultures. 79 Another consular report highlighted the low standard of business behaviour in the Persian region. Bankers and traders there, it advised, tended to be honest in their relations with Europeans only when it served their purpose to be so. Local merchants would delay transactions, and often tried to avoid payment and repudiate contracts if they thought they were going to suffer a loss.

989.  364.  715.  526.  428. ‘Japanese Commercial Morality’, Times, 26/09/1888. Henry C.  227. Letter on ‘Trading with the Chinese’, Economist, 24/08/1929. CHAPTER 3 Deceit, Piracy, and Unfair Competition: Western Perceptions of the Level of Morality in Japan Abstract Chapter 3 considers the discourse on commercial morality as it applied to international transactions, focussing in particular on Western views of Japanese trade and commerce. The criticisms that the Japanese could not be trusted had their origins in the early days of treaty port trade and the personal experiences of Western merchants and diplomatic representatives, but they gained increasing currency from the 1890s when Westerners for the first time became subject to Japanese law.

71 The same letter writer mentioned above, who was also active in the cotton trade, explained how fraudulent practices of this kind made it difficult for honest merchants to compete with honesty in places like Asia. 72 The reputation of the British trader therefore continued to be widely seen as the guarantor of ongoing success in the international trading environment. It is in that context that the British and other industrial nations came to compare their own standards of honesty with those of other countries.

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